Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

I bet you thought this is going to be about a movie.  It’s not.

My dear friend Amir Brown recently posted this to Facebook.

Was driving down seven Mile and saw a guy passed out in a flower bed. Looked like someone was talking to him but then they walked away and he was still laying there so I turned around.
Pulled up and the guy roused himself enough to give me his name (Alex) and his father’s phone number. Called the dad to tell him where his son was and then called an ambulance.
While waiting l, Alex made his way over and passed out by my car.
Fire and EMS arrive and we all try to figure out where the wasted white guy in flip flops came from.
Turns out there is a rehab facility down the street.
I called his dad back to tell him they were taking his son to Detroit Receiving Hospital. We had a brief conversation about Alex being in his tenth year of severe alcoholism and how he had just bolted from the rehab center after his dad brought him some cigarettes and money for essentials.
I told him that my family had been through this too and that all we can do is hope that Alex pulls it together before he faces more severe consequences. My uncle lost both his legs and eventually his life because of alcoholism.
I was struck by how sad and resigned his father sounded. How bereft.
Addiction is a hell of a thing.
I hope Alex gets the care he needs.

Coincidentally, a few weeks ago in a some moments of self-reflection I was revisiting the parable of the Good Samaritan.

I realized that at times I’ve been all of the characters from that story except the robbers.

I’ve certainly been the smart-ass lawyer who tries to trick Jesus with the question; “Who is my Neighbor?” I’ve also been the two guys too busy with their own concerns to stop and help.  I’ve experienced being the guy in need.  Last summer during recovery from shoulder surgery I was dependent on the kindness of friends and family because I could not drive for eight weeks.  I learned gratitude and humility.  Gratitude I’m pretty good at.  Humility, not so much.

Not often, but from time to time I’ve been able to be the Samaritan.

Hey Amir, thanks for reminding us who are our neighbors and our duty to be the Samaritans.

 

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