Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

I bet you thought this is going to be about a movie.  It’s not.

My dear friend Amir Brown recently posted this to Facebook.

Was driving down seven Mile and saw a guy passed out in a flower bed. Looked like someone was talking to him but then they walked away and he was still laying there so I turned around.
Pulled up and the guy roused himself enough to give me his name (Alex) and his father’s phone number. Called the dad to tell him where his son was and then called an ambulance.
While waiting l, Alex made his way over and passed out by my car.
Fire and EMS arrive and we all try to figure out where the wasted white guy in flip flops came from.
Turns out there is a rehab facility down the street.
I called his dad back to tell him they were taking his son to Detroit Receiving Hospital. We had a brief conversation about Alex being in his tenth year of severe alcoholism and how he had just bolted from the rehab center after his dad brought him some cigarettes and money for essentials.
I told him that my family had been through this too and that all we can do is hope that Alex pulls it together before he faces more severe consequences. My uncle lost both his legs and eventually his life because of alcoholism.
I was struck by how sad and resigned his father sounded. How bereft.
Addiction is a hell of a thing.
I hope Alex gets the care he needs.

Coincidentally, a few weeks ago in a some moments of self-reflection I was revisiting the parable of the Good Samaritan.

I realized that at times I’ve been all of the characters from that story except the robbers.

I’ve certainly been the smart-ass lawyer who tries to trick Jesus with the question; “Who is my Neighbor?” I’ve also been the two guys too busy with their own concerns to stop and help.  I’ve experienced being the guy in need.  Last summer during recovery from shoulder surgery I was dependent on the kindness of friends and family because I could not drive for eight weeks.  I learned gratitude and humility.  Gratitude I’m pretty good at.  Humility, not so much.

Not often, but from time to time I’ve been able to be the Samaritan.

Hey Amir, thanks for reminding us who are our neighbors and our duty to be the Samaritans.

 

Tipping Point?

As the week of the semi-treasonous news conference comes to an end many wonder “is this the tipping point?”  I afraid that’s wishful thinking.  But there has been some hopeful reporting, from of all places – Wired Magazine.

I read Wired from time to time but never for its political content.  That’s changed.  In the article “What Robert Mueller Knows and Nine Areas He’ll Pursue Next” Garrett M. Graff takes a very deep dive exploring the likely sources of trouble for Trump.  He begins with a shout out to Deputy Attorney General Rob Rothstein.

Why would anyone put up with the abuse, vitriol, and daily haranguing from the president’s Twitter account that Rosenstein has endured? Why would Rosenstein seemingly set precedents that undermine the core principles of the Justice Department, an institution that he’s devoted nearly his entire career to serving?

I have a simple theory: In a world of hedgehogs and foxes, Rosenstein today is the ultimate hedgehog.

Rosenstein knows one very big, monumental, history-shaping thing—how Trump’s presidency will end—and he’s wagered that if he can hang on long enough, justice will be done and the good guys, in his eyes, will win. His early actions, around Comey’s firing, will be vindicated by history when seen by the light of his bravery and personal sacrifice and refusal to be bullied into quitting, a move that would almost surely lead to Mueller’s investigation being shut down or circumscribed by whichever Trump appointee takes over supervising it next.

If you play inside political baseball give this article the time it requires.

The Obama Bros of Pod Save America help keep me sane in these times.  Dan Pfeffer observes that though some Republican Senators are finding their voices talk is cheap.  With John McCain on the sidelines the the split is 50-49.  It would only take one Republican to do some serious shit

Subpoena the interpreter in the room?  Now that would be something.

Any of it likely to happen? Naw!

Pfeiffer’s book “Yes we (Still) Can” is on it’s way from Amazon.  I got the hard cover.

Bring on the weekend and savor summer while it’s here.

 

Open the Pod Bay Door, Hal

I thought  political junkieism was a benign addiction. It no longer is. I’m not much of a television watcher but National Public Radio and the New York Times have been as welcome and as natural a part of daily life as sunlight.  Politics is my fantasy football. Not so much anymore. And you can probably guess why.

The news is literally depressing.  I cannot count the ways; the incivility, the racism, the sexism, the lies, the calculated actions that divide society rather than unite, the robbing of the poor and middle class to further enrich the wealthy. What churches, schools or parents espoused these values when we were growing up?  Taxing graduate students on their free tuition? Eliminating the $250 deduction teachers can take when they pay for classroom supplies?I cannot hear his voice without cringing yet I cannot silence him.

A little perspective. We once had a President that talked like this in an exchange with New York Times columnist David Brooks.

Out of the blue I asked, “Have you ever read Reinhold Niebuhr?”

Obama’s tone changed. “I love him. He’s one of my favorite philosophers.”

So I asked, What do you take away from him?

“I take away,” Obama answered in a rush of words, “the compelling idea that there’s serious evil in the world, and hardship and pain. And we should be humble and modest in our belief we can eliminate those things. But we shouldn’t use that as an excuse for cynicism and inaction. I take away … the sense we have to make these efforts knowing they are hard, and not swinging from naïve idealism to bitter realism.”

Trump would not have understood the quote much less have the ability to actually read one of Niebuhr’s books.

 One way I’ve reduced the vexing noise is tuning into Podcasts. Chief among these is “Pod Save America” with former Obama White House staffers  Jon Favreau, Jon Lovett, Dan Pfeiffer and Tommy Vietor .  They describe themselves as “a political podcast for people not yet ready to give up or go insane”. YES!

In a recent New York Times profile observed.

Like conservative talk radio or Fox News, “Pod Save America” is an authentic partisan response to the perceived failings of the mainstream media. While many conservatives hate the mainstream media for its supposed liberal bias, many liberals have come to despise what they see as its tendency toward false equivalence — a grievance particularly inflamed by the coverage of Hillary Clinton during the 2016 campaign. Liberals don’t want a hermetically sealed media ecosystem of their own, so much as one that does away with the pretense of kneejerk balance: a media that’s willing to say one side is worse than the other. “I screamed at the TV a lot in the White House,” Favreau says. He and his co-hosts particularly loathe the bipartisan on-air panels of blabbering pundits that cable networks deployed during the election. “If there is one way that I would sum up what the 2016 election was on cable news,” Lovett says, “it was world-class journalists interviewing morons.”

And it’s a reality check.

“Pod Save America,” to its hosts and its listeners, is a twice-weekly reality check. “I think that when you have a president gaslighting an entire nation,” Vietor says, “there’s a cathartic effect when you have a couple of people who worked in the White House who are like: ‘Hey, this is crazy. You’re right, he’s wrong.’ ”

And a call to action.

What is absent from the podcast, significantly, is any of the usual liberal squeamishness (or, depending on your point of view, principle) about using media as a tool of partisan advantage. Liberal activists point regretfully to Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert, who in their Comedy Central heyday were happy to savage Republicans but refused to champion Democrats: In 2010, the pair drew some 215,000 people to the National Mall a few days before the midterm elections, only to keep the rally strictly nonpartisan. “Pod Save America,” by contrast, isn’t afraid to, as Ben Wikler of MoveOn puts it, “actually touch Excalibur.” At the theater in Richmond this month, shortly before bringing Northam and the rest of Virginia’s Democratic ticket onstage, Favreau asked the crowd: “Is everyone registered to vote? Is everyone going to be doing phone-banking and canvassing? Because if not, you have to leave.”

Bless you, Boys!

What are your favorite Podcasts?

Don’t Drink the Water

When I turned on the kitchen faucet, like most of you, I didn’t give much thought as to how clean and purified water got all the way from the river to my house. At least not until about two years ago when Mayor Mike Duggan asked me to Chair Detroit’s Board of Water Commissioners. Now I think about it a lot.

We are in the third day of a “Boil Water” advisory for a large area of the city and I live smack dab in the middle of that area. So I’m boiling water and dirty dishes are gathering in the sink because I can’t run the dish washer.

The problem originated in the venerable Water Works Park just up E. Jefferson from where I live. This is one of three intake facilities that suck the water into the system from the Detroit River.  A key pump failed and the water pressure in the effected area dropped. Water mains (the big pipes that bring the water to your house) are old. Over time they accumulate a certain amount of what I’ll simply call crud. As long as the mains are pressurized the crud stays in place. But a drop in pressure can stir the crud up and release bacteria.

This is an interesting lesson in the geopolitics of Southeast Michigan. From the first days of the city’s establishment Detroit has been responsible for all of the water and sewerage activities for the entire region. The system began in Detroit and was expanded to meet the needs of the suburbs as they sprawled north, south and west (can’t go east because of Lake St. Clair).

In the early 70’s urban planners expounded the benefits of Regional Government – combining municipal services over the boundaries of many individual suburban communities. They have had success with the concept in places like Toronto. Since the Water and Sewage system provided services to the entire region this was a good candidate for regionalization. But the idea of regional government coincided with the election of Detroit’s, first Black Mayor the Honorable Coleman A. Young. He and many Black Detroiters were suspicious. Why was it okay for Detroit to run the system for many decades until a Black Mayor was in charge?The idea of Detroit’s jewels was born. The white suburbanites were out to plunder Detroit’s jewels; the Art Institute, the Zoo, Belle Isle and the water system.

For reasons that are complicated and involve corruption under former Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, the system came under the jurisdiction of a Federal Judge. On January 1, 2016 the fans of regional operation of the water system got their wish. The collecting and purifying of water and the treatment of sewage is now the responsibility of the Great Lakes Water Authority.

But as the saying goes – be careful what you wish for.

GLWA (glee-wah) leases the plant and equipment from Detroit and is responsible for all operations. Detroit is simply a retail customer like all of the other cities in the region albeit the largest at 45% of total capacity.

It’s GLWA that screwed up. And it’s not the first time. Residents of the Jefferson Chalmers neighborhood got raw sewage in their basement after a very large rain storm last summer because 6 out of 15 pumps at the Conner Creek pumping station were off line.

Conner Creek Pumping Station on E. Jefferson

 

This is exactly what Coleman Young feared. If we don’t control the system Detroit will always get shitty service. Now for what it’s worth GLWA delivered foul smelling water to a number of Downriver communities earlier this year. How’s this for bureaucratic speak?

Cheryl Porter, chief operating officer for the authority, said that despite the odor the water is safe to use in any manner.

“In regard to the concerns about water quality in a number of Downriver communities, the authority has conducted extensive testing of its water at its Southwest Treatment Plant and in locations where odor is being detected,” she said in a statement. “Tests confirm that all regulatory water-quality standards are being achieved, and that the water is safe.”

In other words “hold your nose and drink”.

The “boil water” water advisory should be lifted today. It was issued in the first place in “an abundance of caution“.

I’m going to invite the CEO and the COO of GLWA to the next meeting of the Detroit Board of Water Commissioners. Someone has a lot of esplaining to do.  I think there will be a lot more wah than glee.

The Emperor’s New Clothes

I’ve not read a lot of Andrew Sullivan’s work. But he channeled many of  the troubling thoughts and fears I’ve been experiencing but trying to ignore for the past several weeks. His piece “The Madness of King Donald” shines a bright light on the elephant in the Oval Office; namely that the President is nuts.

He begins with the litany of lies which are verifiably untrue but for which there is never an acknowledgment or correction. The lie is repeated and often doubled down by a bigger lie. What kind of person does this? Someone in a very troubling state of mental health.

I keep asking myself this simple question: If you came across someone in your everyday life who repeatedly said fantastically and demonstrably untrue things, what would you think of him? If you showed up at a neighbor’s, say, and your host showed you his newly painted living room, which was a deep blue, and then insisted repeatedly — manically — that it was a lovely shade of scarlet, what would your reaction be? If he then dragged out a member of his family and insisted she repeat this obvious untruth in front of you, how would you respond? If the next time you dropped by, he was still raving about his gorgeous new red walls, what would you think? Here’s what I’d think: This man is off his rocker. He’s deranged; he’s bizarrely living in an alternative universe; he’s delusional. If he kept this up, at some point you’d excuse yourself and edge slowly out of the room and the house and never return. You’d warn your other neighbors. You’d keep your distance. If you saw him, you’d be polite but keep your distance.

Sullivan says journalists simply have to call him on his lies immediately and to his face.  We shall see.

The patriarch of the Ilich sports, gaming and pizza empire Mike Ilich passed away. His significant impact on the city I love cannot be overstated.  But you have to separate what he did and how he did things. He had his detractors. Stephen Henderson wrote of some of the ambiguity we feel.

But he also leaves a complex legacy. The strife over some of his projects and the public subsidies for them. The fans who decried the tenure of his ownership of two of the city’s major sports franchises. They are part of who he was, too.

Happy Monday to you all. I’ve got four days of work before I get to leave on a vacation to a very warm place.

Desearía poder hablar español.